Tuesday, 24 October 2017
You are here:  Home
 
 Privacy Statement

JOB SEEKERS

What happens to the information collected during an assessment?

The information collected contributes to an assessment report.  Assessment reports are managed as confidential documents, and are only accessed by those officers of this company and client organisations who have a reasonable need to know.  In most cases the people viewing reports will have either (i) been through the assessment process themselves, or (ii) have a thorough understanding of the assessment processes, and will have a proper and respectful attitude towards the management of them. 

This consultancy practice holds all original assessment materials, results and reports generated by the assessment process.  The information is collected directly from the assessee, and is held in locked secure storage.  The assessment data is used to prepare a report that is then provided “in confidence” to the designated representative of the client organisation.

The client organisation has a policy of holding the report in secure storage under the direct supervision of a designated officer key holder, who lends the report to those who have a reasonable need to know for as long as they need to use it.  The report is then returned to the key holder and made secure.  No other copies are made of the report, nor are reports held in normal personnel files.  The reports are used to add objective information obtained at arm’s length to human resources decisions about the individuals assessed. 

Sometimes the information collected may be used by the consultancy firm or the client organisation in technical research to review how the assessment process is functioning.  When that research is conducted, the information is usually de-identified and grouped together with other data so that an individual’s information cannot be recognised or reconstructed.

How the information is managed

The only information used in preparing the assessment report is information supplied by the assessee.  That can include a resume in addition to data collected during the screening, assessment, training and interview processes.  Client organisations may provide a position description, assessee specification, organisation chart and/or briefing on points of interest to them.  Such documents are used to provide context to the assessment, but none of those documents are included in the assessment report. 

The assessee provides the personal information, and is relied upon to disclose it accurately.  It is the psychologist’s responsibility to administer and interpret the assessment tools accurately.

The information is held in secure locked storage separate from any other files, and is accessed only by the assessor and client organisation officers who have a reasonable need to know.  The assessment report can be changed only by the assessing psychologist, and that happens only after new information has been provided by the assessee. 

The officers of the client organisation are advised in the secure handling of assessment reports, which includes protecting reports from unauthorised access or disclosure.

The assessing psychologist holds assessment results for approximately five years, but may destroy it thereafter if it is unlikely that the assessee will return for re-assessment or if the data is not needed for research.  Destruction of unwanted assessment information follows practices for destroying confidential material. 

Similarly, most client organisations hold assessment reports for as long as the assessee is of interest to them, which could be a matter of weeks for unsuccessful assessees, or years for a long term employee.  Client organisations are aware of the limits of the utility of assessment reports, and know to request a review of the assessment before using it again if several years have elapsed or if the assessee may have changed since the original assessment.  The new assessment replaces the old assessment report, and the assessment management cycle commences anew. 

How to access and correct assessment information

An assessee is given reasonable access to their information, upon establishing their identity as the assessee.

Access is provided in the first instance through feedback given by the assessing psychologist, which is usually after the outcome of the assessee’s candidacy is known.  After the assessee has received feedback from the assessing psychologist, the assessee may approach the client organisation’s designated office holding the assessment information to be reminded of the words of the report.  If the assessee seeks further interpretation of the assessment data then that can be obtained from the assessing psychologist.  Assessees are free to make notes of anything explained, read or shown to them at any stage of the feedback. 

At this stage assessees are not offered a copy of their assessment report.  Instead, they are offered ongoing access to the assessing psychologist.  This practice is followed so that assessees obtain contemporary and relevant interpretations of assessment information.  This practice parallels the practice with client organisations whereby they consult the assessor before using an existing report for the purposes other than the original one. 

If the assessee subsequently wishes to use the assessment information in connection with other applications to other organisations, the following procedure ensures that appropriate use is made of the information.  If the assessee authorises the assessing psychologist to speak to a third party on their behalf, then the psychologist can converse with the third party on their behalf, and provide suitably qualified comments appropriate to the situation at hand.  The psychologist can make allowances for the age of the assessment information and its applicability to the situation, and ensure that the assessee’s interests are appropriately protected.  Whereas if the assessee where to provide the third party with a copy of a report which was written for a different purpose some time before there would be grave danger of the report being misinterpreted and misapplied, to the disadvantage of the assessee.  This procedure is consistent with best practices in occupational testing specified by the Australian Psychological Society in its Supplement Guidelines for the Use of Psychological Tests, 1997. 

If an assessee disagrees with an opinion included in their assessment report, then they are free to take that concern to the commissioning organisation, as well as to register it with the assessor.  The feedback procedure includes a complete read through the report, and any corrections or updates offered by the assessee can be noted when made.  If the amendments offered by the assessee are material to the content or purpose of the assessment, then means of resolving the differences between assessor and assessee are pursued, for example, through reference checking or some other form of observed behaviour or performance.  The results of the resolution process are also noted in the assessee’s file. 

Further Advice

Should you require further advice on any of the above matters, please approach your assessing psychologist in the first instance.

 

EMPLOYER

What happens to the information collected during an assessment?

The information collected contributes to an assessment report.  Assessment reports are managed as confidential documents, and are only accessed by those officers of this company and client organisations who have a reasonable need to know.  In most cases the people viewing reports will have either (i) been through the assessment process themselves, or (ii) have a thorough understanding of the assessment processes, and will have a proper and respectful attitude towards the management of them. 

This consultancy practice holds all original assessment materials, results and reports generated by the assessment process.  The information is collected directly from the assessee, and is held in locked secure storage.  The assessment data is used to prepare a report that is then provided “in confidence” to the designated representative of the client organisation.

The client organisation has a policy of holding the report in secure storage under the direct supervision of a designated key holder, who lends the report to those who have a reasonable need to know for as long as they need to use it.  The report is then returned to the key holder and made secure.  No other copies are made of the report, nor are reports held in normal personnel files.  The reports are used to add objective information obtained at arm’s length to human resources decisions about the individuals assessed. 

Sometimes the information collected may be used by the consultancy firm or the client organisation in technical research to review how the assessment process is functioning.  When that research is conducted, the information is usually de-identified and grouped together with other data so that an individual’s information cannot be recognised or reconstructed.

How the information is managed

The only information used in preparing the assessment report is information supplied by the assessee.  That can include a resume in addition to data collected during the screening, assessment, training and interview processes.  Client organisations may provide a position description, assessee specification, organisation chart and/or briefing on points of interest to them.  Such documents are used to provide context to the assessment, but none of those documents are included in the assessment report. 

The assessee provides the personal information, and is relied upon to disclose it accurately.  It is the psychologist’s responsibility to administer and interpret the assessment tools accurately.

The information is held in secure locked storage separate from any other files, and is accessed only by the assessor and client organisation officers who have a reasonable need to know.  The assessment report can be changed only by the assessing psychologist, and that happens only after new information has been provided by the assessee. 

The officers of the client organisation are advised in the secure handling of assessment reports, which includes protecting reports from unauthorised access or disclosure.

The assessing psychologist holds assessment results for approximately five years, but may destroy it thereafter if it is unlikely that the assessee will return for re-assessment or if the data is not needed for research.  Destruction of unwanted assessment information follows practices for destroying confidential material. 

Similarly, most client organisations hold assessment reports for as long as the assessee is of interest to them, which could be a matter of weeks for unsuccessful assessees, or years for a long term employee.  Client organisations are aware of the limits of the utility of assessment reports, and know to request a review of the assessment before using it again if several years have elapsed or if the assessee may have changed since the original assessment.  The new assessment replaces the old assessment report, and the assessment management cycle commences anew. 

How to access and correct assessment information

An assessee is given reasonable access to their information, upon establishing their identity as the assessee.

Access is provided in the first instance through feedback given by the assessing psychologist, which is usually after the outcome of the assessee’s candidacy is known.  After the assessee has received feedback from the assessing psychologist, the assessee may approach the client organisation’s designated office holding the assessment information to be reminded of the words of the report.  If the assessee seeks further interpretation of the assessment data then that can be obtained from the assessing psychologist.  Assessees are free to make notes of anything explained, read or shown to them at any stage of the feedback. 

At this stage assessees are not offered a copy of their assessment report.  Instead, they are offered ongoing access to the assessing psychologist.  This practice is followed so that assessees obtain contemporary and relevant interpretations of assessment information.  This practice parallels the practice with client organisations whereby they consult the assessor before using an existing report for the purposes other than the original one. 

If the assessee subsequently wishes to use the assessment information in connection with other applications to other organisations, the following procedure ensures that appropriate use is made of the information.  If the assessee authorises the assessing psychologist to speak to a third party on their behalf, then the psychologist can converse with the third party on their behalf, and provide suitably qualified comments appropriate to the situation at hand.  The psychologist can make allowances for the age of the assessment information and its applicability to the situation, and ensure that the assessee’s interests are appropriately protected.  Whereas if the assessee where to provide the third party with a copy of a report which was written for a different purpose some time before there would be grave danger of the report being misinterpreted and misapplied, to the disadvantage of the assessee.  This procedure is consistent with best practices in occupational testing specified by the Australian Psychological Society in its Supplement Guidelines for the Use of Psychological Tests, 1997. 

If an assessee disagrees with an opinion included in their assessment report, then they are free to take that concern to the commissioning organisation, as well as to register it with the assessor.  The feedback procedure includes a complete read through the report, and any corrections or updates offered by the assessee can be noted when made.  If the amendments offered by the assessee are material to the content or purpose of the assessment, then means of resolving the differences between assessor and assessee are pursued, for example, through reference checking or some other form of observed behaviour or performance.  The results of the resolution process are also noted in the assessee’s file. 

Further Advice

Should you require further advice on any of the above matters, please approach your assessing psychologist in the first instance.

REFERRAL / REWARD PROGRAM

Participants authorise the promoter and its agents to seek access to, collect and use information about them for the purposes of marketing, planning, development and administration of the program.

In accordance with the Privacy Act, participants can access personal information about them held by the promoter and its agents and advise if they believe it is inaccurate, incomplete or out-of-date by contacting the promoter.

 

GENERAL

This website privacy statement does not apply to linked web sites, however we do not link knowingly to sites that are privacy-invasive. When you link to another site, we recommend you read the privacy statement of that site to familiarise yourself with its privacy policy.

ANONYMOUS ACCESS TO OUR SITE

You can access the myfirstsalesjob ® home page and browse our web site anonymously, without disclosing your personal information.

COLLECTION AND USE OF PERSONAL DATA

The myfirstsalesjob ® site does not collect or record personal information, other than information you choose to provide though our enquiries. On-line surveys may collect personal information as and when they occur (note on-line surveys are in the form of a secure transaction).

Deakon Pty Ltd. staff use personal information collected from email and online survey sources to respond to individuals and discuss their particular enquiries.

Email addresses and any other contact details you provide will not be added to a mailing list without your consent.

ACCESS AND CORRECTION

If the Freedom of Information Act is not applicable, Deakon Pty Ltd. will examine whether access can be given under IPP6, the access principle under the Information Privacy Act.

DISCLOSURE

We will not disclose your personal information to a third party without your consent, unless we are required or authorised to do so by law or other regulation. In the event of an investigation into suspected unlawful or improper activity, a law enforcement agency or government agency may exercise its legal authority to inspect the web server's records (eg. in relation to hacking or abusive messages).

COLLECTION AND USE OF SITE VISIT DATA

We do not use cookies on our site. A cookie is a block of data that is shared between a web server and a user's browser. Cookies give the server information about a user's identity and website visiting patterns and preferences.

The following non-personal information (i.e. clickstream data) is automatically recorded by this site's web server for statistical and system administration purposes only:

  • your server address;
  • your top level domain name (e.g. .com, .au, .gov);
  • the date and the time of your visit to the site;
  • the pages you accessed and downloaded;
  • the address of the last site you visited;
  • your operating system;
  • the type of browser you are using.

To the extent that this data could make you identifiable, Deakon Pty Ltd. will not attempt to identify individuals from the records the server automatically generates unless that is necessary to investigate a breach of law or regulation.

SECURITY OF YOUR PERSONAL DATA

All employees of Deakon Pty Ltd.have a statutory duty to deal with your personal information confidentially (Information Privacy Act, section 67).

This web site uses secure transmission facilities when appropriate (e.g. survey transaction, which is seasonal). You should be aware that there are risks in transmitting information across the Internet.

If you are concerned about conveying sensitive material to Deakon Pty Ltd. over the Internet, you might prefer to contact us by telephone or mail.

LEGAL DISCLAIMER

The content of this web site is provided for information purposes only and no claim is made as to the accuracy or authenticity of the content of the web site.

Deakon Pty Ltd. does not accept any liability to any person for the information or advice (or the use of such information or advice) which is provided on this web site or incorporated into it by reference.

The information on this web site is provided on the basis that all persons accessing the site undertake responsibility for assessing the relevance and accuracy of its content.

No responsibility is taken for any information or services which may appear on any linked web sites.

Privacy Statement | Terms & Conditions
 
Nike Pas Cher Nike Tn Pas Cher Nike Tn Pas Cher Nike Tn Requin Pas Cher UGG Pas Cher Nike Tn Requin Pas Cher http://www.novaxel.com/chaussuresnike.html http://www.diginext.fr/positions/nikepascher.html http://www.nrbc-sudest.org/public/niketnpascher.html http://www.histoire-compiegne.com/requinniketn.html http://boutique.girondins.com/uggpascher.html http://www.territoires-haute-normandie.net/tnpascher.html Nike Pas Cher Nike Pas Cher Nike Tn Pas Cher Nike Tn Pas Cher Nike Tn Pas Cher Nike Tn Pas Cher Nike Blazer Pas Cher